A call from the universe

A call from the universe

A call from the universe

Hello, I am suffering from severe ptsd, anxiety and depression and am feeling stuck. I need to do something but don’t know what. Are you able to help?

There it is. A call from the universe. Someone who, after years of contemplation, manages to muster the courage to reach out. These are the spectacular moments of bravery that inspire me.

I imagine a solitary soul, standing on a cliff shouting to the universe:

Hello, is anybody out there? Do you hear me? Do you see I am suffering and that I’m alone?

We’re here. I call back. We can’t see you but we hear you. Where are you? Come join us. You’d be welcome and there’s room.

January may be a month of cold, but it warms my heart to meet new members and welcome them to our community.

New programs are starting next week. Virtual and in person. It’s not to late it you’re interested. Just drop us a line or give us a call. It just takes a few moments of courage.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

I am not enough

I am not enough

I am not enough.

It’s belief that many people with PTSD hold. A wish that somehow, they could have/should have done more. It’s only by seeing the enormity of a problem that we are able to truly appreciate how big it is. Suddenly our efforts feel small.Those who are injured in war or times of conflict tend to be quite silent about their experiences. So deep runs the shame that they wanted to do more. Recently a veteran shared a wonderful Helen Hayes quote with me:We relish stories of our heroes, forgetting that we are extraordinary to someone too.If you were injured in service to your country, whether at home or overseas, you have been part of a united contribution that defines the Canada we are proud to call home. We can never truly know how efforts may have shaped our lives. Your contributions did matter, and you are someone’s hero.

Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.Executive Director, Landing Strong

Paying attention to what’s working

Paying attention to what’s working

Paying attention to what’s working

It’s often much easier to notice what we’re doing wrong, rather than what we’re doing right. Military and first responder roles rely on critical analysis of potential shortfalls in order to maximize safety. 

Even when our actions are not motivated by the desire for recognition, it’s always satisfying to know when we got it right or that our efforts are making a difference. 

The problem of focusing on our missteps and passing over successes, however small they might be, is that is fosters a bias to overlook the good when we are confronted with challenges.

I like to think of the person who came up with the idea of building the first boat.  They may have thrown many items in the water and examined what made them sink, but chances are they spent more time examining what made things float in order to come up with the winning formula. It can often be easier to focus on our weaknesses rather than our strengths. But how much healthier would we be if we mastered the habit of noticing what we do well?

How might your day be different if the focus was on all the little things you are doing that are having a positive impact?  Can you identify three in this moment?Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.Executive Director, Landing Strong

The relationship we have with ourselves

The relationship we have with ourselves

The relationship we have with ourselves is often the most difficult

 

We often have automatic self beliefs that stop us from seeing ourselves accurately.  If I believe that I’m not enough in some way, my brain will selectively seek out examples that support this belief. I might ignore the many signs that contradict it.

Group involvement offers a chance to get to know ourselves better. It’s an opportunity for growth. By seeing ourselves through the compassionate lens of others, we alter the way in which we view ourselves.

The stories we make up about ourselves may not always be true. They might just be habits. When we can name these things, we take away some of their power. We have a chance to tell the story differently.

Are you carrying any stories that you might like to re-write?

We’d love to hear from you.

Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

Being intentional about our space

Being intentional about our space

Being intentional about our space

Busy lives can often translate into cluttered homes. In many ways, our environments really do reflect our internal states.

My husband Joe is going away for work for an extended period of time this fall. He doesn’t yet know it, but amazing things are going to happen to our home in his absence. Inspired by the Home Edit, I’m committed to intentionally organizing our house so that it is calming and joyful. I actually want to have fun with this. It’ll be important for me to place items that spark happiness in plain sight.

Deb Dana, Social Worker and Polyvagal Theory expert speaks of the importance of objects and surroundings as tools for self-regulation. She suggests that we take a moment to find something that reminds us of the feeling of being anchored and calm (regulated), then placing it somewhere we’ll see it as we move through our day.

Simple suggestions for positive internal shifts.

In our next Maintaining Health Program we’re going to explore more of Deb Dana’s work. We’re calling the day “Get Your Glimmer On.” It’s in person, with a trip to Maker’s in the afternoon. Please let us know if you are planning on coming so that we might order lunch and reserve a spot for you

Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

No risk no reward

No risk no reward

No risk no reward

Often the things that are the most rewarding involve challenging ourselves. It’s through pushing the limits of what’s comfortable that we discover our strengths: whether it’s through signing up to race in the Valley Harvest Run or allowing ourselves to be seen and heard within group. Taking small risks, while scary at first, ultimately allows us to become more confident healthy versions of ourselves.

What challenges might you look forward to this fall?

Are you willing to lean out of your comfort into an area of new growth

What could you tell yourself when that little voice in your head threatens to get in your way?

We still have spots in the on-line Identity and Transition program if this speaks to you. We’re a community that supports each other as we take small risks aimed to improve the quality of our lives.

Anything worth doing likely has something in it that’s hard.

Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.Executive Director, Landing Strong