We’re all in the same storm.

We’re all in the same storm.

We’re all in the same storm.

We’re all in the same storm, just different boats. It’s not what happens to us that’s important, it’s the meaning of it within the context of our lives.

Before Dorian, Fiona or our recent flooding, we may have been buying storm chips and dare we say even a bit excited about the possibility of a storm. This doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. Because we are so connected to one another and are aware of the hardships our friends and neighbours have experienced, these weather events take on new meaning.

If you’re looking for support, we’re only a call away. You don’t need to “earn” your spot in counselling or our programs. If you’re ready there is a seat waiting for you. There’s currently no wait list.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

No storm lasts forever.

No storm lasts forever.

No storm lasts forever. 

Nova Scotians love to talk about the weather. It’s a time-honored tradition, presumably linked to the fact that many residents of the province work in fishing and farming. Their safety and livelihood depended on good weather. We are also a unique province in the frequency with which we experience multiple seasons in the same day.

Over the past few months there has been a shift. Talking about the weather has been less a source of amusement, and more a source of anxiety or concern. There have been good reasons for it, for some of the greatest hardships we have faced recently have been connected to extreme weather.

It is in times when we are being tested that we truly witness the strength of community. Alone in a storm, no-one fares well. Together, we are stronger and better prepared to face what the elements might bring.

When we are connected with others, it is easier to remember that no storm lasts forever.
Find your strength within community.

We have a number of programs starting this fall. New members are always welcome. Fell free to give us a call.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

Are you sleeping at night?

Are you sleeping at night?

Are you sleeping at night?

“Mindfulness is a way of befriending ourselves and our experience.”
– Jon Kabat-Zinn

This week my sleep has been elusive. I know why. I’ve been watching too much news that documents multiple natural disasters as they unfold. My heart and thoughts have been with people around the world struggling as they face adversity.

Our humanity compels us to watch, but the format of presentation, jumping from story to story and image to image, does not allow for mindful processing of what we witness.

I know that it’s only by acknowledging the impact things have on us that we are able to properly attend to our needs.

What I really need to do is find a moment when I can simply be still and present with my emotions.

Doing art is a helpful activity that allows me to make sense of my day.

If I allow myself this time for reflection, I will sleep better.

Is there any part in your day that allows you to pause and reflect on how you are doing? What might carving out this time for yourself look like?

There’s no “right way” of doing mindfulness. It’s a matter of what is right for you.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

Giving yourself a therapy vacation

Giving yourself a therapy vacation

Giving yourself a therapy vacation

Trauma recovery is hard work.

Just because recovery is your focus does not mean that you don’t need down time.

It’s not only therapists who need vacations. Clients too need therapy breaks.

Taking time off work due to injury is not the same thing as a vacation. Doing the work to recover requires steady effort and focus. Other people might perceive time away from the job as time off or vacation. We know it’s far from that.

Just as we would take breaks to rest and recharge from our jobs, the same is true for trauma recovery.

How much time do you think would be healthy or helpful for you?

Please enjoy it, guilt free, and know that we are doing the same.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

Are we there yet?

Are we there yet?

Are we there yet?

In any journey, it’s easy to get hung up on the destination. “Are we there yet?!” our internal voice demands, wanting to know when the point of arrival has come. I’ve shifted my mindset around this concept in recent years, realizing that half the joy lies in the journey itself. It’s something my parents seemed to have figured out given the numerous adventurous road trips we took together as a family. The journey was the whole point. 

Trauma recovery is similar, in that there is never actually an end point. This doesn’t mean it’ll always be hard, but continuous movement is part of ongoing health. 

Join the movement by pre-registering for one of our fall programs today.  

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

A cause for celebration

A cause for celebration

A cause for celebration

In this busy-paced life we lead, I am reminded of the importance of reflection: taking the time necessary to gather our thoughts, celebrate accomplishments and plan for the future. Today is such a day at Landing Strong. Led by Board Members Tara Burley, Adrienne Oldham and the team from Fire Inside Leadership, our Landing Strong Team took the morning to discuss our shared vision for the organization, remembering to be kind to ourselves as we collectively strive to reach ambitious goals for the future. I want to take this moment to thank all of the staff, Board Members and consultants at Landing Strong for the hard work they do, guided by their hearts and passions to help others navigate their way towards health and wellness.

I also look forward to celebrating the accomplishments of our Landing Strong Community members next week during our Celebration of Unsung Heroes Event. Not a graduation, but a celebration of continued work and contribution to community.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong