Recovery is a Journey not a Destination

Recovery is a Journey not a Destination

Recovery is a Journey not a Destination

Many people when they face a setback in their recovery may think, ‘Oh I’m not as far along as I thought I was.’ When in fact, its simply a bump on the road. Not an indication that they weren’t where they thought they were.

There will be many bumps, that’s natural. Just like how an athlete won’t run their best run every day, you too will have ups and downs on the road of recovery.

How do we stay strong when the journey feels so long? By simply taking note of small wins, we fuel ourselves for the longer journey.

One of the unique things about group therapy is newer members get the chance to meet people further along the road. It helps to trust the process, knowing that if you just keep walking, you’ll get to where you want to be.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

We’re all in the same storm.

We’re all in the same storm.

We’re all in the same storm.

We’re all in the same storm, just different boats. It’s not what happens to us that’s important, it’s the meaning of it within the context of our lives.

Before Dorian, Fiona or our recent flooding, we may have been buying storm chips and dare we say even a bit excited about the possibility of a storm. This doesn’t seem to be the case anymore. Because we are so connected to one another and are aware of the hardships our friends and neighbours have experienced, these weather events take on new meaning.

If you’re looking for support, we’re only a call away. You don’t need to “earn” your spot in counselling or our programs. If you’re ready there is a seat waiting for you. There’s currently no wait list.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

The pile of paperwork sitting in the corner

The pile of paperwork sitting in the corner

The pile of paperwork sitting in the corner

It’s there, staring at me. I know you get it. We all have such piles.

Our heap of “to dos” that we’ve not yet had the chance to get to.

Here’s the interesting thing. The more anxious I become about it, the less likely I am to actually do it. The anxiety associated with the task takes on a life of its own.

When we avoid small things, they start to feel very big. If we can bring ourselves to respond to them in the moment, we take away their power. It may involve asking for help from others or leaning into challenging emotions. It doesn’t have to become a big weight to carry.

Feeling anxious about things doesn’t change them.

Leaning into them does.

I’m dedicated to spending the next few days leaning into my areas of discomfort: taking a look at my piles and developing a strategy to address them. I want my exterior and interior worlds to be aligned.

I don’t have to do it all. Just bite size pieces over the next week.

Perhaps you have a similar corner that you’d like to work on.

Join me.

Warm thoughts,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong

Starting the season of giving

Starting the season of giving

Starting the season of giving

This week a news report spoke of the challenge many people are having making ends meet.  Food banks are being accessed at record levels, and countries around the world are feeling the impact of global warming on food supply.  It’s easy to feel overwhelmed. Instead, I chose to focus on appreciation for what I do have, the ability to extend some of that abundance to others.Inside the entrance of Landing Strong, we’ve planted a magic giving tree.  Under it, are placed a few donations for the local food bank.  It’s our hope that these few items will multiply to the point where food spills out into the lobby.  We invite you to contribute to its growth.  When the world feels too big, just remember how small efforts can create a ripple effect of positivity.Happy December,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.Executive Director, Landing StrongPS. Please don’t forget to enroll now for upcoming programs: Date Night Thursday, December 8 from 6pm-9pmMaintaining Health Thursday, December 15 from 9am-3pmStop Faking Good Start Feeling Good: Emotions Management          Co-ed group starts Wednesday, January 11 and runs for five weeks          Women’s only group starts Friday, January 13 and runs for five weeksCreating Confidence and Clarifying Strengths          Starts Tuesday, January 10 and runs for five weeksManaging the Cultural Divide          Starts Thursday, January 12 and runs for five weeks All programs are being offered in person. Please let us know if you have interest in on-line delivery for any of our programs and if we have enough people we will offer on-line as well.

I am not enough

I am not enough

I am not enough.

It’s belief that many people with PTSD hold. A wish that somehow, they could have/should have done more. It’s only by seeing the enormity of a problem that we are able to truly appreciate how big it is. Suddenly our efforts feel small.Those who are injured in war or times of conflict tend to be quite silent about their experiences. So deep runs the shame that they wanted to do more. Recently a veteran shared a wonderful Helen Hayes quote with me:We relish stories of our heroes, forgetting that we are extraordinary to someone too.If you were injured in service to your country, whether at home or overseas, you have been part of a united contribution that defines the Canada we are proud to call home. We can never truly know how efforts may have shaped our lives. Your contributions did matter, and you are someone’s hero.

Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.Executive Director, Landing Strong

Two steps forward, one step back

Two steps forward, one step back

They may reappear when you least expect it.  Just when things were getting better, a symptom returns, reminding you of a past that you had hoped was left behind. 

What does it mean when old symptoms reappear?  

Even when you’re working hard on your recovery, it’s normal for symptoms to occasionally come back.  

It’s really hard to feel like you’re not making forward progress, or that you’re not recovering even though you’re doing the work.  But we know that recovery isn’t linear.  Our symptoms serve as indicators that our total load has crept up higher than is healthy.  By paying attention to it, we are able to examine the areas of our life that need to be addressed.  

There’s a lot of background stress these days, so don’t be surprised if the buffer is thin.  The amount of stress we can handle under normal conditions isn’t the same as what we can handle during challenging times.  Instead of judging ourselves, let’s try to practice compassion.  See if there is anything you can do to lighten your load, and remember… this too shall pass.  

Warm regards,

Belinda Seagram, Ph.D., R. Psych.
Executive Director, Landing Strong